New development in 3D super-resolution imaging gives insight on Alzheimer's disease

One major problem with understanding Alzheimer’s is not being able to clearly see why the disease starts. A super-resolution ‘nanoscope’ now provides a 3D view of brain molecules with 10 times greater detail. This imaging technique could help reveal how the disease progresses and where new treatments could intervene.
Source: Science Daily

'Skinny fat' in older adults may predict dementia, Alzheimer's risk

A first-of-its-kind study has found that ‘skinny fat’ — the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass — may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. Using data from a series of community-based aging and memory studies, researchers assessed the relationship of sarcopenic obesity or ‘skinny fat’ with performance on various cognition tests. Results show that sarcopenic obesity was associated with the lowest performance on global cognition.
Source: Science Daily

Alzheimer's in mini format: A novel tool to study disease mechanisms and possible remedies

Scientists have been successful in mimicking mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease in a novel, stem cell-based model system that reproduces features of human brain tissue. This experimental tool can be used to study mechanisms of pathology and help to find new therapeutic approaches, the researchers say. Their results indicate that modulating the immune system can trigger neuronal repair processes and thus possibly help the brain to better cope with Alzheimer’s.
Source: Science Daily

A typical communication pattern of people with Alzheimer's disease

Dementia, in any form, is a heartbreaking disease that can take away one’s thinking and judgement abilities before they pass. To save face, people with dementia often pretend to know answers to questions, even if they really don’t. This often hides the severity of the disease and exasperates the fears and frustrations of the people who care for them. The act of pretending to know answers to keep up appearances is referred to as “saving appearance responses” (SARs), and a research group has performed the first statistical analysis of SARs in patients with various forms of dementia.
Source: Science Daily

Move it and use it: Exergaming may help those at risk of Alzheimer's or related dementias

Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), often a precursor to Alzheimer’s, showed significant improvement with certain complex thinking and memory skills after exergaming, according to a new study. The results could encourage seniors, caregivers and health care providers to pursue or prescribe exergames (video games that also require physical exercise) in hopes of slowing the debilitating effects of those with MCI, sometimes a stage between normal brain aging and dementia.
Source: Science Daily