Immigration fight threatens the stability of Angela Merkel's coalition

  1. Immigration fight threatens the stability of Angela Merkel’s coalition  Washington Post
  2. Merkel Faces Showdown in Germany Over Migrant Policy  Wall Street Journal
  3. Germany migrants: Key Merkel ally Seehofer threatens to quit  BBC News
  4. Angela Merkel’s government is on the brink of collapse – and we should all worry about what might happen then  The Independent
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Immigration fight threatens the stability of Angela Merkel's coalition

  1. Immigration fight threatens the stability of Angela Merkel’s coalition  Washington Post
  2. Merkel Faces Showdown in Germany Over Migrant Policy  Wall Street Journal
  3. Germany migrants: Key Merkel ally Seehofer threatens to quit  BBC News
  4. Angela Merkel’s government is on the brink of collapse – and we should all worry about what might happen then  The Independent
  5. Full coverage


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Angela Merkel and her vision of Europe survive to fight another round

  1. Angela Merkel and her vision of Europe survive to fight another round  Washington Post
  2. Germany’s migrants: Seehofer ‘offers to resign’ over migrants  BBC News
  3. No Resolution to German Government Crisis Over Migrant Plans  U.S. News & World Report
  4. EU falls short of stopping boats  The Australian
  5. Merkel’s migration battle: Seehofer ‘offers to resign’  The Guardian
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Angela Merkel fights for survival as interior minister Seehofer says he will turn away migrants at the border

Angela Merkel fights for survival as interior minister Seehofer says he will turn away migrants at the borderAngela Merkel, the German chancellor, was on Sunday night once again fighting for her political future after her interior minister slammed the migration deal she secured with her EU counterparts last week as “ineffective”. Horst Seehofer, Germany’s Interior Minister and leader of the Christian Social Union (CSU), said on Sunday that he now saw “no alternative” but to turn back some migrants at the German border, a party source told Reuters news agency. Mr Seehofer, one of Mrs Merkel’s biggest political rivals, also said the matter was affecting the “credibility” of his role as party leader, hinting at a possible resignation. Two weeks ago he gave Mrs Merkel an ultimatum to find a European solution to irregular migration by this Sunday, or he would defy her by turning migrants back at the border against her wishes. After a two-day summit with EU leaders in Brussels last week, Mrs Merkel believed she had struck such a deal. However, Mr Seehofer apparently does not agree.  After an “ineffective” two-hour meeting on Saturday night between Mrs Merkel and Mr Seehofer, the two leaders met with their respective parties for separate meetings in Munich and Berlin on Sunday night. Merkel’s migration tensions | Read more According to information from the German press agency, Mrs Merkel has spoken to her executive committee of a “very serious” situation. If Mr Seehofer is not satisfied he could now make true to his threats and close Germany’s borders, forcing Mrs Merkel to sack him, which would tear apart Germany’s already shaky coalition government.  This could lead to fresh elections, which would likely further embolden the far-Right and lead to political crisis in both Germany and Europe. Alternatively, Mr Seehofer could voluntarily step down as interior minister. Mrs Merkel on Sunday afternoon firmly reiterated her desire for a solution that is “not unilateral” and ”not to the detriment of third parties,” in an interview with German ZDF television. However she also said on her way into the discussions with her party in Berlin on Sunday afternoon that she had taken the CSU’s issue into account. “I want the CDU and CSU to work together, because we are a success story for our country,” she said. CDU Secretary General Annegrete Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, Angela Merkel and minister Julia Kloeckner met on Sunday Credit: Michele Tantussi/Getty Images Tensions were high in Berlin on Sunday as party talks ran into the night. Michael Theurer, of the Free Democratic Party (FDP) said: “The mutual trust of CDU and CSU is more or less destroyed… and the government chaos produced harms Germany and its citizens.” However the effectiveness of the migration deal struck by Mrs Merkel and other EU leaders this week was also questioned. Mrs Merkel circulated a document to her coalition partners after the summit saying that 14 countries had agreed “on a political level” to take back some migrants who had passed through other EU countries on their way to Germany. But the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary later said they had not signed the agreement. A protestor holds a placard reading “Merkel must go” outside the CDU headquarters  Credit: REUTERS/Axel Schmidt Leaders agreed to set up “voluntary” control centres within the EU to process migrants. However Austria, France, Germany and Italy did not commit to any immediate plans to open secure centres on their own soil. Following the summit Mrs Merkel admitted there was still “a lot of work to do to bridge the different views”. Donald Tusk, the European Council president, said it was a “sort of” political breakthrough, but also added it was “too early” to call it a success. However Emmanuel Macron, the French President, hailed the agreement as an example of  “European cooperation”. Germany’s coalition government has been plagued by tensions since it was formed in February, four months after the German federal election last November. Mr Seehofer blames his party losing seats to the far-Right Alternative for Germany (AfD) during the last election on Mrs Merkel’s open-door refugee policy. With the Bavarian state elections due in October, Mr Seehofer fears the CSU could now lose its outright majority to the AfD. 


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Angela Merkel warns migration challenge could 'determine Europe's destiny' as bloc embraces hardline

Angela Merkel warns migration challenge could 'determine Europe's destiny' as bloc embraces hardlineThe European Union embraced a new hardline agenda to defend its borders against illegal migration last night as Angela Merkel warned that the fate of the bloc depended on addressing the three-year crisis over migration. Europe’s growing crop of populist leaders claimed victory for their “Fortress Europe” agenda which saw the European Council summit in Brussels putting deterrence and the protection of EU borders at the forefront of its migration policy. “Europe has many challenges but migration could end up determining Europe’s destiny,” Mrs Merkel told the German parliament before the summit, with her own political future hanging in the balance following a rebellion against her softer migration policies by her Bavarian coalition partners. The draft summit conclusions showed the German leader’s long-standing calls for an inclusive approach to migration playing second fiddle to the need to secure Europe’s borders and process illegal migrants off-shore so they could be returned to their countries of origin. Sebastian Kurz, the conservative Austrian chancellor who is in coalition with the far-right Freedom Party, said the shift was a victory for those states who have argued that the EU’s soft approach is creating ‘pull factors’ for migration.   Merkel’s migration tensions | Read more “It seems as if today we will manage a shift in migration policy,” he said, adding that being rescued in the Mediterranean “must not automatically become a ticket” to central Europe. “That’s important because we have asked for a systemic change for years. For years we have demanded reductions in the number of people coming to Europe illegally. I think that is possible today.” Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister who put up fences on Hungary’s border with Serbia in 2015 after Mrs Merkel threw open Germany’s border, said the change was a victory for the concerns of Europe’s voters. “The main issue is not migration, the issue is democracy in Europe … it is about what the people believe, what should be done,” he said before claiming the people wanted migrants to be sent back to where they came from. He added that the move heralded the start of a “new period when we try to reconstruct the European democracy.” Mr Orban’s claims of a victory for ‘democracy’ will send shudders through liberal Europe which believes that the Hungarian leader is using the consensus for a harder line over migration as a Trojan horse for a broader illiberal agenda. Donald Tusk, the European Council president, warned on the eve of the summit that failure to address the migration question risked handing ammunition to populists and those with “a tendency towards overt authoritarianism” – which was widely taken as a reference to the likes of Mr Orban. But Mr Tusk said that the EU’s measures – which include beefing up Europe’s border force to 10,000, forging return deals with African states and investigating setting up so-called hotspot camps in north Africa – were necessary to avoid something worse. “Some may think I am too tough in my proposals on migration. But trust me, if we don’t agree on them, then you will see some really tough proposals from some really tough guys,” he said. Emmanuel Macron, the French president, said that the measures were not designed to put an the end to the idea of ‘European solutions’ to migration pressures, but to modernise them and enable them to work better. “We all face a simple choice: do we want national solutions or do we believe in European solutions and cooperation? For my part, I will defend European solutions, in cooperation, in the European Union and under Schengen,” he said Italy’s new populist government withheld judgement on the proposals, after a month in which it has refused permission for NGO migrant rescue ships to dock at its ports and demanded EU states share the burden of the 600,000 migrants that have arrived in the last two years. Guiseppe Conte, the Italian prime minister, welcomed the proposals and pledges to do more to help Italy, but made clear that his government – which has already catalysed the debate – would continue to push for real outcomes. “We hope these words will be translated into action,” he said. “Italy no longer has a need for words and statements, we need concrete acts.”


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Chancellor Angela Merkel seeks special EU talks on migration: report

  1. Chancellor Angela Merkel seeks special EU talks on migration: report  Deutsche Welle
  2. How Far Will Bavaria’s Conservatives Go to Fend Off the Far-Right?  Foreign Policy (blog)
  3. Merkel’s Migration Fight at Home Weakens Her With EU  Bloomberg
  4. A Battle Over Migration Is Threatening to Topple Angela Merkel  The Atlantic
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Angela Merkel shares viral photo of her staring down Donald Trump at G7

Angela Merkel shares viral photo of her staring down Donald Trump at G7German Chancellor Angela Merkel has shared a photo of her tenaciously staring down US president Donald Trump during the G7 Summit in Canada. The image alludes to some tension at the gathering which was branded the “G6 plus one� due to Mr Trump’s isolation over trade and his decision to pull America out of the Iran nuclear deal. The photo, which has been widely shared on social media, came amid mounting tensions between Mr Trump, Ms Merkel, and other G7 leaders over trade disputes.


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