Dogs can detect agricultural diseases early

Laurel wilt disease has had a devastating effect on the avocado industry in South Florida in past harvest seasons. Early detection can be instrumental in deterring a widespread infection. The use of scent-discriminating dogs has shown to offer the avocado industry legitimate signs of hope in their fight against the spread of the disease throughout their groves.
Source: Science Daily

Alignment of mother and offspring body clock could prevent diseases such as heart disease and obesity

The care provided by a mother can impact the body clock and health of offspring after birth, according to new research. By reducing abnormalities in the body clock of offspring, it may be possible to develop therapies for serious lifestyle-related diseases, such as heart disease and obesity.
Source: Science Daily

'Mono' virus linked to 7 serious diseases

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) — best known for causing mononucleosis — also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases, according to a new study. The diseases are: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. Combined, these diseases affect nearly 8 million people in the US.
Source: Science Daily

Birds migrate away from diseases

In a unique study, researchers have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young — as moving away from diseases in the tropics enables them to survive with a less costly immune system.
Source: Science Daily

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study finds

Genetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving family members.
Source: Science Daily

Determining the cause of difficult-to-control mitochondrial diseases

A research group has discovered that the ‘non-essential’ amino acid taurine is important for protein translation in mitochondria and is involved in mitochondrial disease development. The group also discovered that a taurine-conjugated compound was able to ameliorate the symptoms of mitochondrial dysfunction through taurine-deficiency.
Source: Science Daily