11 dead after duck boat sinks during storm near Branson, Mo. Divers halt search for at least 5 missing.

  1. 11 dead after duck boat sinks during storm near Branson, Mo. Divers halt search for at least 5 missing.  Washington Post
  2. 11 Dead After Duck Boat Capsizes Near Branson, Mo.  New York Times
  3. Missouri duck boat capsizes killing at least 11 people  BBC News
  4. VIDEO WARNING: Viewer captures moments before Ride the Ducks boat sinks  KY3
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Divers reveal extraordinary details of cave rescue in Thailand

  1. Divers reveal extraordinary details of cave rescue in Thailand  NEWS.com.au
  2. Thai cave rescue divers given diplomatic immunity: report  Yahoo News
  3. Australian Thai cave divers got diplomatic immunity: report  SBS
  4. Trump-Kim summit and the Thai cave rescue: Two media frenzies, two different stories  The Straits Times
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Thai cave rescue divers given diplomatic immunity: report

Thai cave rescue divers given diplomatic immunity: reportTwo Australian divers who helped extract the young football team trapped in a Thai cave obtained diplomatic immunity before the rescue in case it failed, national broadcaster ABC reported Monday. The “Wild Boars” team were stuck in the cave in northern Thailand for 18 days before Thai Navy SEALs and international cave diving experts successfully removed them in a highly risky, three-day-long operation. Anaesthetist Richard Harris and his diving partner Craig Challen, both cave diving specialists, played key roles in the rescue.


Source: Yahoo! News

Thai cave boys mourn death of Navy Seal as British divers reveal authorities were out of their depth

Thai cave boys mourn death of Navy Seal as British divers reveal authorities were out of their depthThe 12 boys rescued from a Thai cave were moved to tears as they paid tribute to the former Navy Seal who died ahead of their dramatic rescue. The “Wild Boars” football team, who are recovering in hospital following 18 days spent inside the Tham Luang cave, wrote messages of thanks on a picture of Saman Kunan after they were told of the diver’s death for the first time since they emerged from their ordeal. Images of the children in their hospital gowns with their heads bowed low were released on Sunday as British divers involved in the international rescue mission claimed the Thai Navy were “out of their depth” before their crucial intervention. Doctors at the Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital where the boys, aged 11 to 16, are being treated said on Sunday that they were in good health and are expected to be discharged on Thursday. The health ministry said the overall condition for the players and coach was “normal”, though many are still on a course of antibiotics after spending nine days in the damp and dark trapped underground. Images of the children in their hospital gowns with their heads bowed low were released on Sunday  Credit:  AFP But experts have urged caution amid the global intrigue surrounding the boys’ stories, saying they would all need to be monitored closely for signs of psychological distress that could take months to manifest and could be triggered by probing media interviews. Medics said the boys were only considered mentally strong enough on Saturday to hear the news of Mr Kunan. When told how Mr Kunan died while installing oxygen tanks along the twisting passageways of the cave many of the boys cried before penning tributes on a drawing of the diver. “All cried and expressed their condolences by writing messages on a drawing of Lieutenant Commander Saman and observed one minute of silence for him,” Jedsada Chokdamrongsuk, permanent secretary at the health ministry, said in the statement on Sunday. “They also thanked him and promised to be good boys.” Attention had shifted away from the boys’ recovery in recent days to the team of British divers who discovered the missing football team and then helped lead an international rescue effort. The divers were hailed heroes on their return to Britain, with more details emerging of the mission to extract the boys through murky waters and through narrow underwater passageways. Reflecting on the mission, Jason Mallinson, 50, a father-of-one from Huddersfield, said the death of Mr Kunan was the wake up call to the Thai Navy that illuminated how crucial the British crew’s expertise would be. Chris Jewell, a British diver who travelled to Thailand to help, gave credit to the “brave” children who “showed no signs of panic” Credit:  HENRY NICHOLLS/REUTERS “They realised they were way out of their depth and they had been lucky to get those guys into that last chamber with the boys and we were the only people who could remedy the situation,” he told the Mail on Sunday. Mr Mallinson described how he was called to action by an emergency text message from the British Cave Rescue Council while at work in Scunthorpe and flew out to Thailand to help immediately. Chris Jewell, another British diver who travelled to Thailand with Mr Mallinson to help, gave credit to the “brave” children who “showed no signs of panic” as he gently pushed them under the surface of the water in the cave system and guided them through the dark to safety. He also described how he become lost in the dark underwater for four minutes while carrying a child to safety before finally finding the guideline and surfacing to complete the rescue.  The boys were expected to watch a recording of the World Cup final on Monday morning after doctors ruled out allowing them to stay up late to view the match live on Sunday night. “Given that the final will be broadcast quite late our time, and we want the boys to rest and not to be looking at screens too much, we will probably record the final and show it to them later,” said the official the Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital. The world football governing body FIFA had invited the boys and their coach to attend the final in Moscow but they can not go for medical reasons. Last week, Manchester United invited the “Wild Boars” to watch a match at their Old Trafford ground. About 4,000 volunteers were on Sunday taking part in a clean-up of the area around the Tham Luang cave. A park area around the mouth got trampled by the hundreds of rescuers, and media workers, who flocked to help with the mission and to report on it.


Source: Yahoo! News

Meet the seven British divers playing leading roles in the Thai cave rescue mission

Meet the seven British divers playing leading roles in the Thai cave rescue missionIt was the most challenging underground rescue in history, and Thai authorities drafted in more than 90 of the world’s finest special forces soldiers. But the spearhead of the Thai cave rescue operation depended on seven British civilians who learnt their craft exploring the chilly waters of abandoned mines and limestone caves of England and Wales. Vernon Unsworth First on the scene was Vernon Unsworth, who is from St Albans but now lives in Thailand.  Mr Unsworth, an experienced diver who now lives close to the caves, was crucial in persuading Thai authorities to bring in UK expertise.  “When Thai Navy Seals went into the cave but they could not see anything because the water is so muddy so they came back,  Chaiyon Srisamut, a friend of Mr Unsworth,  told the Daily Mail.  British caver Vernon Unsworth gets out of a pick up truck near the Tham Luang cave complex Credit: REUTERS/Panu Wongcha-um “He knew some English guys who could definitely help.”  John Volanthen and Rick Stanton  With the go-ahead from Thai authorities, Mr Unsworth contacted John Volanthen, an IT consultant based in Bristol, and Rick Stanton, a former midlands fire fighter.   The pair have been described as the “A Team” by Bill Whitehouse, vice chairman of the British Cave Rescue Council.  John Volanthen  Credit: Facebook Mr Stanton, 56, Mr Volanthen, 47, discovered the boys and their coach trapped in an air pocket 2.5 miles into the cave system last week. Mr Whitehous told Radio 4’s Today programme last week: “They have been at the spearhead of making their way through because they have the skills and expertise to do it. “One of the first things they had to do in pushing through is lay a guideline so that they could get out again and so others could follow along.” Richard Stanton  Credit:  Coventry Telegraph Voices heard on a video of the moment the group was discovered in the cave belong to Mr Stanton and Mr Volanthen. The pair have established a reputation as being among the greatest cave rescue divers on the planet – but both have day jobs in the UK. Mr Stanton has been a firefighter in Coventry for quarter of a century, while Mr Volanthen is an IT consultant based in Bristol. Both are volunteers with the South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue Team. In 2011, the pair set a world record for the longest cave dive, penetrating 9km (5.5 miles) down a system in northern Spain using specially developed equipment. Robert Harper British diver Robert Charles Harper Credit:  REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun The UK divers operation to locate the lost boys was overseen by Mr Harper, 70, a veteran potholing expert from Somerset.  He was given a hero’s send-off by the Thai authorities as he left Thailand on Thursday.   Weerasak Kowsurat, the sports minister, thanked him for his “dedication to duty and professionalism,” before he left.  Chris Jewell and Jason Mallison The British team were joined by two more divers: Chris Jewell and Jason Mallison of the Cave Diving Group, Britain’s oldest amateur association of subterranean divers.  Both are considered experts in the tight-knit community of cave divers.  Mr Mallison previously rescued six British cavers from Mexico’s Cueva de Alpazat cave system. In 2010, he joined up with Mr Stanton and Mr Volanthen to break the record for the longest ever cave dive. The trio, along with Dutch explorer Rene Houben, spent 50 hours underground charting 5.5 miles of previously unexplored submerged caves in Mexico. Tim Acton Also on the scene was Tim Acton, 39, who grew up in Harwich and first learnt his trade diving off the Essex coast. He moved to Southeast Asia 12 years ago and now runs a holiday complex in Thailand with his wife, Took. In 2004 he was caught up in the Boxing Day Tsunami and earned a commendation from the British Ambassador for his efforts to save lives when the village where he was running a diving school was swamped. He was invited to join the cave rescue by contacts in the Thai Navy SEALs. He was inside the cave system several times during the operation. During the rescue operation, his father, John, 71, said: “There’s a total media blackout at the moment so we are getting no information.  Tim Acton and his family Credit: Family handout “All I know is Tim got a call to go on stand by to go to the caves by the Thai Naval Seals and he had to send the measurements of his shoulders because they didn’t know if his shoulders were too big to go in there.  “Then he got the call to go to (Chiang Rai) they picked him up to go to the airport, apparently they are in excellent accommodation.  “He was told there were 55 naval seals in Team One and in Team Two, which he was to be part of, was the supply team with 20 ex-Naval Seals and two Westerners – Tim and his mate who is a Spaniard.  “Up until Saturday besides the two English divers who found them they were the only two Western divers, since them I’m led to believe an Australian cave diving team has gone in there. “I’m very proud of the fact of his selflessness. He’s doing nothing different to what our armed forces, police and firemen do every day, by putting his life at risk to help someone else.  “I spoke to him just before he left … he said he was feeling a bit nervous which I was pleased about.  “If he didn’t have any nerves I’d be a bit worried.”  


Source: Yahoo! News

Cave rescue: The divers who got the Thai boys out

  1. Cave rescue: The divers who got the Thai boys out  BBC News
  2. Elon Musk Defends His Rejected Mini-Sub Plan for Thai Cave  New York Times
  3. Navy SEALs who rescued Thai soccer team from cave almost didn’t make it out, military officials say  ABC News
  4. Thai cave rescue: Inside the sacred danger of Tham Luang  ABC News
  5. From mission impossible to mission accomplished: Thailand rejoices as last boys rescued from cave  Los Angeles Times
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Thai Cave Rescue: Divers Make Final Push to Save Remaining Boys, Coach

  1. Thai Cave Rescue: Divers Make Final Push to Save Remaining Boys, Coach  Wall Street Journal
  2. Cave rescue: Eight rescued Thai boys in ‘good health’  BBC News
  3. Eight rescued, five remain in Thailand cave as operation resumes  ESPN
  4. Why we can’t stop watching the Thai cave rescue  CNN
  5. Final push to rescue remaining boys and their soccer coach from Thai cave under way  NEWS.com.au
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Thai cave rescue: Divers prepare to resume phase 3 — live updates

  1. Thai cave rescue: Divers prepare to resume phase 3 — live updates  CBS News
  2. Cave rescue: Divers ready to save remaining five Thais  BBC News
  3. Elon Musk sends an ‘escape pod’ to help in Thailand cave rescue  USA TODAY
  4. Why we can’t stop watching the Thai cave rescue  CNN
  5. Ambulances arrive on site as Thai rains hit area after 4 more boys pulled from flooded cave  Chicago Tribune
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Cave rescue: Divers ready to save remaining five Thais

  1. Cave rescue: Divers ready to save remaining five Thais  BBC News
  2. Thai Navy SEAL team posts touching photo during international effort to rescue boys from cave  CBS News
  3. Elon Musk unveils ‘kid-size’ submarine for Thai cave rescue  Washington Post
  4. Dr. Marc Siegel: Boys rescued from Thai cave now face possible medical and mental health issues  Fox News
  5. 4 more boys pulled from flooded Thai cave; rescue of remaining boys, coach could take two operations  Chicago Tribune
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