How to make the gene-editing tool CRISPR work even better

Scientists have found conclusive evidence that Cas9, the most popular enzyme currently used in CRISPR gene editing, is less effective and precise than one of the lesser-used CRISPR proteins, Cas12a. Because Cas9 is more likely to edit the wrong part of a plant’s or animal’s genome, disrupting healthy functions, the scientists make the case that switching to Cas12a would lead to safer and more effective gene editing.
Source: Science Daily

Genome damage from CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing higher than thought

Scientists have discovered that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought. This has safety implications for future gene therapies using CRISPR/Cas9 as the unexpected damage could lead to dangerous changes in some cells. The study revealed that standard DNA tests miss finding this genetic damage, and that caution and specific testing will be required for any potential gene therapies.
Source: Science Daily

Heritable genome editing: Action needed to secure responsible way forward

An independent inquiry has concluded that editing the DNA of a human embryo, sperm, or egg to influence the characteristics of a future person (‘heritable genome editing’) could be morally permissible. If that is to happen, a number of measures would need to be put in place first to ensure that genome editing proceeds in ways that are ethically acceptable.
Source: Science Daily

ANKRD16 prevents neuron loss caused by an editing-defective tRNA synthetase

ANKRD16 prevents neuron loss caused by an editing-defective tRNA synthetase

ANKRD16 prevents neuron loss caused by an editing-defective tRNA synthetase, Published online: 16 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0137-8

ANKRD16 attenuates neurodegeneration induced by a mutation in the editing domain of alanyl tRNA synthetase by directly accepting mis-activated serine from the synthetase before transfer to the tRNA, establishing a new mechanism by which editing defects are prevented.
Source: Nature