AP Explains: Removal of mines from Korean Demilitarized Zone

AP Explains: Removal of mines from Korean Demilitarized ZoneSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea has begun removing mines at two sites inside its heavily fortified border with North Korea, which is expected to do the same as part of their recent deals to ease decades-long military tensions. They will likely end up pulling out a very small portion of an estimated 2 million mines littered inside and near the 248-kilometer (155-mile) -long, 4-kilometer (2.5-mile) -wide Demilitarized Zone. But it would be the rivals’ first joint demining work in more than a decade and comes amid international diplomacy aimed at ridding North Korea of its nuclear weapons.


Source: Yahoo! News

Korean Summit: The pomp, the substance and what it means

Korean Summit: The pomp, the substance and what it meansPYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — South Korean President Moon Jae-in has wrapped up a three-day visit to North Korea’s capital, the first by a South Korean leader in 11 years. His meetings with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un appear to have put wobbly U.S.-North Korea talks on the North’s nuclear weapons back on track. A look at what happened and what it means:


Source: Yahoo! News