Preakness could ultimately land on 'super track' at Laurel

  1. Preakness could ultimately land on ‘super track’ at Laurel  USA TODAY
  2. Preakness 2018: Justify tops odds; Bob Baffert looks for Triple Crown  WABC-TV
  3. How to bet the Preakness Stakes: Late odds, contenders, posts, horse racing gambling terms explained  CBSSports.com
  4. Justify’s Top Foe at the Preakness? Maybe His Own Hind Leg  New York Times
  5. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Trump made a video on Yanny vs. Laurel, and this meme is officially dead

Trump made a video on Yanny vs. Laurel, and this meme is officially deadWhy won’t government institutions leave memes alone? The Yanny vs. Laurel debate took a dark turn when the U.S. Air Force thought it would be a good idea to use it in a now-deleted tweet that bragged about repressing a Taliban offensive.  SEE ALSO: What Yanny vs. Laurel taught us: We yearn to be divided But the White House killed the meme for good when it released a video of staffers dividing into Team Yanny and Team Laurel. Think this is fake news? We can assure you that unfortunately, this is very real. Here’s the video: Ivanka Trump is definitely on Team Laurel, but Kellyanne “alternative facts” Conway isn’t
too loyal to her side. She proudly says, “It’s Laurel,” before adding, “But I could deflect and defer to Yanny if you need me to.”  A little too real, Kelly. The video also includes this exchange with White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, which is
really concerning considering the White House’s strained relationship with the press:  Yikes.  Even Mike Pence joined the fun, robotically turning to the camera and asking, “Who’s Yanny?” The real icing on the cake is President Trump himself. Seated at his desk, Trump proclaims, “I hear covfefe.”  We get that it’s a joke, but come on, White House. Don’t you have more important things to deal with?  WATCH: Yanny or Laurel? We asked around the office and fights almost broke out.


Source: Yahoo! News

Forget Yanny and Laurel, what the heck is this toy saying?

Forget Yanny and Laurel, what the heck is this toy saying?The Yanny/Laurel debate divided the internet more than The Dress did a few years ago. It ruined more friendships than pineapple on pizza. It’s facilitating more arguments than the
American Chopper meme. It’s tearing us apart more than Lisa ever did.  SEE ALSO: What Yanny vs. Laurel taught us: We yearn to be divided But let’s be real: the Yanny/Laurel thing is already getting kind of old — isn’t there anything else to talk about? When you log into
any social media site, it seems like everyone’s still arguing over whether that audio clip is saying Yanny or Laurel. The U.S. Air Force jumping in on the debate was the final nail in the coffin: Yanny/Laurel is a dead meme. But don’t worry, everyone! If you’re on the hunt for a new mystery to ruin all your relationships, listen to this video: is the toy saying “brainstorm” or “green needle?”  If you heard “brainstorm,” try thinking “green needle” and then listen again — you’ll probably hear “green needle” this time. Now try it in reverse: think “brainstorm” and then listen to the video. You may even be able to hear “green storm” or “brain needle.” You can pretty much choose what you hear. It’s wild.  Understandably, people are freaking out about this. One Redditor offered this explanation for why you hear what you’re thinking:  Comment from discussion You can head “brainstorm” or “green needle” based on whichever one you think about. OK, that makes sense. It’s the most rational explanation. But u/syntheticwisdom said what we all feel: Comment from discussion You can head “brainstorm” or “green needle” based on whichever one you think about. After all, it’s almost like we love memes like The Dress and Yanny/Laurel because we
want to be divided! WATCH: Yanny or Laurel? We asked around the office and fights almost broke out.


Source: Yahoo! News

'Laurel or Yanny' just took a super dark turn thanks to the U.S. Air Force

'Laurel or Yanny' just took a super dark turn thanks to the U.S. Air ForceNothing lasts forever and no meme goes untarnished. On Thursday morning, the U.S. Air Force jumped on the never-ending “Laurel or Yanny” meme and took it to a really dark place, proving memes and military action just don’t mix. The social media minds behind the U.S. Air Force Twitter account decided to employ the hotly-debated two names in a tweet bragging about fighter jets providing air support to repress a Taliban offensive.  The Taliban Forces in Farah city #Afghanistan would much rather have heard #Yanny or #Laurel than the deafening #BRRRT they got courtesy of our #A10. Read more: https://t.co/pTxpG3X6Ui pic.twitter.com/vLbCg94P3w — U.S. Air Force (@usairforce) May 17, 2018 SEE ALSO: Is there something wrong with me if I only hear Yanny and not Laurel? The link included in the tweet is a story about Air Force air support efforts to prevent Taliban forces from overtaking Farah city which… is a long way off from the light-hearted debate that ensued over “Laurel or Yanny.” Many on Twitter agreed. Yikes guys…a little much maybe? — John M. Pipes (@jm_pipes) May 17, 2018 Haha! It’s funny because a bunch of people are dead. — David Kleppinger (@DrKlep) May 17, 2018 pic.twitter.com/d2t29YAyxL — G.I. Joey Joe Joe Jr. Schabado (@GIJoeyJoeJoe) May 17, 2018 well this was fun while it lasted — Tyler Huckabee (@TylerHuckabee) May 17, 2018 I hope the military didn’t spend too much of its missing 21 trillion dollars on its social media campaign, cuz they’d be overpaying at minimum wage. — Jon P (@jp_in_nj) May 17, 2018 pic.twitter.com/IHJCDTaKAK — Andre (@hahaohman) May 17, 2018 Read the room. — coreyspring (@coreyspring) May 17, 2018 Just to clarify, is this the Air Force glorifying the delivery of deadly force from the air in an intractable war? Can you confirm that no innocent civilians were killed? — Watsobo (@spacecitybase) May 17, 2018 Gross — exurb expert (@underscoredan) May 17, 2018 No, not even the social media masters of the armed forces are immune to the backlash of a jokey misfire.  Then again, maybe our own Chris Taylor was right all along: the memes are just here to divide us.  What a time to be alive. WATCH: Yanny or Laurel? We asked around the office and fights almost broke out.


Source: Yahoo! News

Yanny or Laurel? Why people hear different words

  1. Yanny or Laurel? Why people hear different words  Los Angeles Times
  2. ‘Yanny’ Or ‘Laurel’? Why People Hear Different Things In That Viral Clip  NPR
  3. Late-Night Hosts Debate: Laurel or Yanny?  Hollywood Reporter
  4. laurel – Dictionary Definition : Vocabulary.com  Vocabulary.com
  5. Laurel or Yanny: What’s the origin of the audio clip that’s dividing opinion?  ABC Online
  6. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Yanny or Laurel? The Patriots have an answer for the internet's greatest debate

  1. Yanny or Laurel? The Patriots have an answer for the internet’s greatest debate  CBSSports.com
  2. Yanny vs. Laurel spotlights our brains’ desire to fill in the gaps  PBS NewsHour
  3. Laurel Or Yanny Debate: What Do You Hear  Patch.com
  4. Is it ‘Yanny’ or ‘Laurel’? Or ‘Yammy?’  Voice of America
  5. Full coverage


Source: Google News

What Yanny vs. Laurel taught us: We yearn to be divided

What Yanny vs. Laurel taught us: We yearn to be dividedRemember the optical illusion known simply as the dress? Sure you do. Black and blue or white and gold? This was the question that divided the internet back in the more innocent time of February 2015. The fault lines ran through marriages and  friendships: We simply could not believe that someone so close to us could see things so differently when the truth, as we saw it, seemed so obvious.  Then came the candidacy and presidency of one Donald J. Trump, and we discovered what divided perceptions
really looked like online. And now, the Trump effect seems to have settled a bit. At this point, you’ve probably blocked and unfriended everyone whose mind could not be changed, or you’ve become numb to the constant lies and corruption, or maybe we’re just in the calm before the Mueller and midterm storms.  Clearly, we needed a new thing that could tear us apart in a safer, more innocent way. Something that would break through the social media filter bubbles we’ve built around ourselves to avoid hearing aggravating opinions. And into that cultural vacuum stepped Yanny vs. Laurel.  SEE ALSO: The original Yanny vs. Laurel audio will finally settle this once and for all This time it was an audio illusion rather than an optical one. In a one-second clip, some heard the name Yanny, some heard Laurel. The clip spread in just as viral a manner as the dress. In a matter of hours it hopped the barrier from Twitter and Facebook sensation to old-school media curiosity. Local news loved it.
The New York Times produced a slider tool that changed the frequency from high to low, helping you hear one sound or the other. As with the dress, our obsession with this test appeared to be derived from its unpredictability. In 2018, cultural bubbles have become almost boringly impenetrable. Tell me how someone voted at the last presidential election, and I’ve got a pretty good chance at guessing their positions on gun control or immigration — and at assessing whether real debate is even possible.  But with Yanny v. Laurel, there’s no telling what a given ear will hear. Anecdotal evidence suggested offices were about equally divided. The controversy was tailor-made for watercooler chatter. “Team Yanny” and “Team Laurel” quickly emerged (as did the smaller subset of us that could hear both and wondered what all the fuss was about). “Our marriage is a lie!” joked a friend on Facebook of her spouse hearing things differently. The subtext of all this: how nice it is to find a vast gulf of difference between friends, especially a difference that doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. This need seems to be something new in the world. It isn’t quite the same impetus that divides us as sports fans; the teams we choose have more to do with our birthplace and family background than anything else. Debates between fandoms — Star Trek and Star Wars, say — are an endless set of questions with no objective answers. Fans who loved or hated
The Last Jedi are almost as immovable as the pro- and anti-Trumpers.  SEE ALSO: ‘Last Jedi’ gets thumbs up from 89% of viewers, says new poll So a big part of what made the divisions over the dress and the audio clip so satisfying is that both controversies had definitive answers that were discovered within 24 hours. Widespread curiosity over such a small thing mandated that we would find the truth sooner rather than later. The dress
was black and blue. The audio clip turned out to be from a recording for Vocabulary.com, and the word was “laurel.” Sorry about that, Team Yanny.  In the era of fake news, when our country can’t agree on a single political reality even when presented with evidence, how nice it is to have that level of certainty! Sports fans never have this sense of closure: Win the World Series or the Super Bowl and you’re still open to the charge that the victory was a fluke. You still have to defend it endlessly. Again, the fact that the stakes are so low is helpful. We’ll remember the controversy, we’ll devour the science on why we hear differently, but there isn’t going to be an online industry of Yanny truthers.  Info Wars (probably) isn’t going to bother insisting that the Deep State is trying to make us hear Laurel. The game is definitively over, but thanks for playing! What does it say about us that we’re so eager for this kind of division? One explanation is the rule of 150, also known as Dunbar’s Number. Turns out our brains have a hard time handling more than this number of friendships, because that’s the rough size of the tribal groups we evolved in. We see the 150 limit cropping up in military units, small businesses, Christmas card lists, and even the number of Facebook friends we actually interact with. But the modern world, driven by social media, bombards us with more friends than we can handle, some of whom we never see. We may live in cultural bubbles, but the bubbles are generally huge.  How can our brains make sense of this? How can they impose the 150 limit again? By latching onto any potential differences that mark people out as members of our tribe. This explains the enduring popularity of online quizzes and the Harry Potter house-sorting: We’re desperate to know where our fellow Hufflepuffs and Ravenclaws are at.  The dress and Yanny vs. Laurel are both low-grade versions of this urge. Few people are going to fall out over hearing an audio clip differently, but it scratches the sorting itch in a mostly harmless way. Now that it’s over, we shuffle back to our bubbles — ready to fight the next culture war, hoping we soon get to fight over a sensual illusion instead.  WATCH: The face behind the #unibrowmovement


Source: Yahoo! News