Mugabe reconciles with the man who ousted him after Mnangagwa sends private jet to pick up Grace

Mugabe reconciles with the man who ousted him after Mnangagwa sends private jet to pick up GraceRobert Mugabe has forgiven Emmerson Mnangagwa, the man who threw him out of power last year, and says that the new president is the right man to rule Zimbabwe.  Mr Mugabe, 94, on Thursday said: “There was an election. Zanu-PF was represented by Emmerson Mnangagwa and [Nelson] Chamisa represented MDC-Alliance and results came out saying the person who won was Emmerson Mnangagwa.  “We have accepted the result and we hope that we will continue respecting the will of the people. The gun does not and should not lead politics.” He added that he was grateful Mr Mnangagwa, 75, had hired a luxury aircraft to take his wife Grace from Singapore to Harare for the funeral of her mother, Idah Marufu, who died last week.  His remarks were markedly different to those he made just six weeks ago, on the eve of the first election since he was ousted, when Mr Mugabe said he would vote for the opposition candidate and that he had not trusted Mr Mnangagwa since they began their political relationship more then 50 years ago.  Africa’s tarnished jewel: how four decades of Robert Mugabe left Zimbabwe’s economy reeling He also previously complained that he was short of money since the soft coup d’etat last November put him and his family under house arrest within their vast estate in Harare’s northern suburbs.  Mr Mugabe claimed he lacked funds to repair the roof of his Chinese-style mansion and needed to move house. Mrs Mugabe, who lead the campaign within Zanu-PF against Mr Mnangagwa to prevent him from becoming her husband’s successor, this week gushed: “He [Mnangagwa] loves us. He knows we we love him too. We pray for him because it’s God’s will that he is president. We pray that he be given the wisdom to lead the country.” Mr Mnangagwa fled to Mozambique after he was sacked as vice president last October following months of humiliations when he was criticised at rallies by Mrs Mugabe, often when he was sitting in the front row.  Grace Mugabe | A life in controversies Months earlier the armed forces airlifted him to hospital in South Africa because he said he was poisoned at a rally he attended with the Mugabes.  In June this year, a grenade exploded at a rally addressed by Mr Mnangagwa, killing two security aides and injuring Kembo Mohadi Kembo, vice president, and Oppah Muchinguru-Kashiri, a cabinet minister.  Many of Mr Mugabe’s supporters encouraged voters to support the opposition MDC Alliance and Mr Chamisa at elections on July 30. The elections went off peacefully but the army opened fire at an anti-Mnangagwa demonstration the next day and killed six people.  Now Mr Mugabe, who was in power for 38 years, says that Mr Mnangagwa won the elections and the results were confirmed by the constitutional court two weeks ago.  Mr Mnangagwa appointed his cabinet Friday and included Olympic star, Kirsty Coventry, a white swimmer, as his sports minister, while ignoring most of those previously favoured by Mr Mugabe. 


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Emmerson Mnangagwa sworn in as president of Zimbabwe

Emmerson Mnangagwa sworn in as president of ZimbabweEmmerson Mnangagwa was officially sworn in as president of Zimbabwe on Sunday after winning a bitterly contested election that marked the country’s first vote since strongman Robert Mugabe was ousted from power. Mnangagwa, whose victory in the July 30 polls was challenged by the main opposition, pledged to “protect and promote the rights of Zimbabweans” in an inauguration ceremony attended by thousands of supporters at a stadium in Harare. “I Emmerson Dambudzo Mnangagwa swear that as president of the republic of Zimbabwe I will be faithful to Zimbabwe (and) will obey uphold and defend the constitution of Zimbabwe,” Mnangagwa said in an oath greeted by thunderous applause from a crowd that also included several African heads of state.


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Zimbabwe's Chamisa rejects court judgment confirming Mnangagwa as president

Zimbabwe's Chamisa rejects court judgment confirming Mnangagwa as presidentNelson Chamisa maintained that he had won the first election since the departure of Robert Mugabe last November and said the Constitutional Court had foiled his bid to subpoena the election commission to provide critical proof to bolster his case. The court dismissed Chamisa’s challenge on Friday saying he had failed to prove his allegations of vote fraud. A widely condemned army crackdown in response to post-election violence by opposition supporters left six people dead on Aug. 1, recalling the heavy-handed security tactics that marked Mugabe’s 37-year rule.


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Top court confirms Zimbabwe's Mnangagwa presidential election victory

Top court confirms Zimbabwe's Mnangagwa presidential election victoryZimbabwe’s top court on Friday dismissed an opposition bid to have presidential election results annulled over alleged rigging in favour of Robert Mugabe’s successor, Emmerson Mnangagwa. In a verdict widely predicted by analysts, Chief Justice Luke Malaba strongly criticised the MDC party’s case and upheld Mnangagwa’s win. Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa Credit: REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo/ “The court finds the applicant has failed to place before it clear, direct, sufficient and credible evidence” of irregularities, Malaba said in his ruling at the Constitutional Court in Harare. “There was no proof of the happenings of these irregularities as a matter of fact.” Mnangagwa, of the ruling ZANU-PF party, won the July 30 election with 50.8 percent of the vote – just enough to meet the 50 percent threshold needed to avoid a run-off against MDC leader Nelson Chamisa, who scored 44.3 percent. His inauguration would now take place on Sunday, justice minister Ziyambi Ziyambi told AFP. Lawyers for the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) had argued that the results should be annulled due to alleged “massive doctoring” of the vote. Africa’s tarnished jewel: how four decades of Robert Mugabe left Zimbabwe’s economy reeling But the court backed lawyers representing Mnangagwa, ZANU-PF and the election commission who rubbished claims that the opposition had produced any substantial evidence of fraud. “I once again reiterate my call for peace and unity,” Mnangagwa said in a television address after the ruling. “Let us put whatever differences we might have behind us. It is time to build our nation and move forward together.” Paul Mangwana, a ZANU-PF spokesman, said outside the court: “We are ecstatic… President Mnangagwa won and that can no longer be disputed. “He is now ready to deliver on his mandate to usher in a new Zimbabwe.” Mnangagwa, who has vowed to revive Zimbabwe’s ruined economy, had hoped the elections would draw a line under Mugabe’s repressive 37-year rule and open up a stream of foreign investment and aid. Campaigning was more open and peaceful than previous votes under Mugabe. But the election was marred by the army opening fire on protesters, killing six, allegations of vote-rigging and a violent crackdown on opposition activists. The MDC had cited a catalogue of alleged discrepancies including incorrect counting, fake “ghost” polling stations, and at some polling stations more ballots being counted than there were registered voters. Police gather outside the Constitutional Court after the court upheld Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa’ s narrow victory in Harare Credit: AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi The party issued a statement saying it would respect the court verdict despite being the victim “of chicanery and electoral pilferage”. “The sombre mood in the country in the wake of today’s court verdict is in itself a telling statement,” it added. Derek Matyszak, a legal expert at the University of Zimbabwe, had predicted that the opposition faced an uphill struggle given the courts’ historic tilt towards ZANU-PF, which has ruled since independence from British colonial rule in 1980. “The outcome (was) pretty predictable,” Matyszak told AFP. The MDC’s appeal, which was lodged hours before the deadline on August 10, forced Mnangagwa’s inauguration – planned for August 12 – to be postponed. International monitors largely praised the conduct of the election itself, although European Union observers said that Mnangagwa, a former long-time Mugabe ally, benefited from an “un-level playing field”. After the ruling, the EU issued a statement saying all parties should accept the verdict, adding that the new government needed to push through electoral reforms after a vote that had “revealed improvements as well as challenges.” Some ZANU-PF supporters celebrated at the party headquarters in Harare. The nine judges delivered the unanimous verdict at the court amid tight security, though no protests were reported after the case. Armed police patrolled in the second city of Bulawayo, an opposition stronghold. The court could have declared a winner, called another election, or ordered a run-off or recount. In a first for the country, the proceedings were broadcast live on state television.


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Mnangagwa urges Zimbabweans to move on after post-election unrest

Mnangagwa urges Zimbabweans to move on after post-election unrestPresident Emmerson Mnangagwa on Monday said Zimbabweans should now unite to rebuild the economy and put behind them the election period that saw six people being killed after the army stepped in to quell post-election protests this month. In his first national address since being declared winner in a disputed presidential vote, Mnangagwa said Zimbabwe had showed the world it could hold a free and peaceful vote but blamed the main opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) for violence that followed. “It is now time to put the election period behind us and embrace the future,” Mnangagwa said during Heroes Day commemorations in the capital Harare.


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Mnangagwa says disputed Zimbabwe election 'behind us'

Mnangagwa says disputed Zimbabwe election 'behind us'Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Monday called for the country to move on from its disputed election, despite his victory being challenged in court over alleged fraud and his inauguration delayed. The country’s first election since the fall of Robert Mugabe was mired by the army opening fire on protesters, allegations of vote-rigging and a crackdown on opposition activists. Mnangagwa, who narrowly won the July 30 vote, took power last year when military generals ousted Mugabe after 37 years in office.


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