Puan, world's oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies aged 62

  1. Puan, world’s oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies aged 62  CNN
  2. The World’s Oldest Known Sumatran Orangutan Has Died at Age 62  TIME
  3. Puan, oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies in Australia  BBC News
  4. ‘Respectful end for an old lady’: World’s oldest orangutan dies in Perth  WAtoday
  5. World’s oldest Sumatran orangutan, Puan, dies in captivity at Perth Zoo at the age of 62  ABC News
  6. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Puan, oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies in Australia

  1. Puan, oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies in Australia  BBC News
  2. The World’s Oldest Known Sumatran Orangutan Has Died at Age 62  TIME
  3. World’s oldest Sumatran orangutan dead, Rahul Gandhi’s, Suu Kyi birthday celebrations, and other news in pictures  The Hindu
  4. Puan, the world’s oldest Sumatran Orang-utan, passes away at Perth Zoo  Community Newspaper Group
  5. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Discovery of the oldest mammal in Brazil pays tribute to David Bowie

Brasilestes stardusti lived around 70 million years ago and was named after Ziggy Stardust, the singer’s iconic persona. Description was based on a fossilized tooth. It’s the 1st indication that placental mammals and dinosaurs co-existed in South America. For scientists, fossil features showed similarities with another pre-historic mammal found in India, suggesting both shared a common ancestral native from the Gondwana supercontinent.
Source: Science Daily

Oldest bubonic plague genome decoded

An international team has analyzed two 3,800-year-old Y. pestis genomes that suggest a Bronze Age origin for bubonic plague. The study shows that this strain is the oldest sequenced to date that contains the virulence factors considered characteristic of the bubonic plague and is ancestral to the strain that caused the Black Death.
Source: Science Daily

'Alien asteroid' may be the oldest object in the solar system

'Alien asteroid' may be the oldest object in the solar systemBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) – An “alien asteroid” that circles the sun in the giant gas planet Jupiter’s orbital path, but hurtling in the opposite direction, is the first-known permanent resident of our solar system that astronomers have concluded originated in another star system. Researchers said on Monday a close examination of the asteroid’s orbit indicated it formed elsewhere and was captured by gravitational forces when our solar system — the sun, planets and various other objects — formed from a swirling cloud of gas and dust about 4.5 billion years ago. “It is a strong candidate for the oldest object in the solar system,” said astronomer Fathi Namouni of Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur in France.


Source: Yahoo! News