South Korea Plays Down Chance of Nuke Progress at Kim Summit

  1. South Korea Plays Down Chance of Nuke Progress at Kim Summit  U.S. News & World Report
  2. South Korean President to Visit Pyongyang in Bid to Revive Diplomacy  Wall Street Journal
  3. Four things to know for the week ahead  BBC News
  4. North Korea’s Trump-Era Strategy: Keep Making A-Bombs, but Quietly  New York Times
  5. Historic Kim Jong Un Summit May Make or Break Moon’s Presidency  Bloomberg
  6. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Pence plays role of Trump's most ardent defender in wake of Times op-ed, Woodward book

  1. Pence plays role of Trump’s most ardent defender in wake of Times op-ed, Woodward book  Washington Post
  2. Pence denies meeting to oust President Trump, says he’d take a lie detector test  USA TODAY
  3. Mike Pence: I Would Take A Lie Detector Test About Anonymous NYT Op-Ed ‘In A Heartbeat’  HuffPost
  4. Full coverage


Source: Google News

Pence would take lie detector test over anonymous op-ed 'in a heartbeat' as he plays up national security risk

Pence would take lie detector test over anonymous op-ed 'in a heartbeat' as he plays up national security riskMike Pence has said that he would submit to a lie detector test “in a heartbeat” to prove he was not the author of an anonymous op-ed describing an apparent “resistance” movement within the administration of Donald Trump looking to work against the president. Calling the article an “assault on our democracy,” the vice president dismissed a theory that he was the potential author of the piece because it uses the word “lodestar” – a word Mr Pence has repeatedly used in speeches – as a mere effort to “distract attention” from the Trump’s administration’s achievements. With the president clearly irked by The New York Times op-ed, Mr Pence made clear that he would do whatever Mr Trump needed to prove his own innocence that he was not the “senior administration official” said to be behind the piece.


Source: Yahoo! News

Attention network plays key role in restoring vision after brain damage

About one-third of patients who have suffered a stroke end up with low vision, losing up to half of their visual field. This partial blindness was long considered irreversible, but recent studies have shown that vision training after optic nerve and brain damage can help restore or improve vision. A new study reports on key mechanisms of vision restoration: attention.
Source: Science Daily