Giant Chinese salamander is at least five distinct species, all heading toward extinction

With individuals weighing in at more than 140 pounds, the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is well known as the world’s largest amphibian. But researchers now find that those giant salamanders aren’t one species, but five, and possibly as many as eight. The bad news is that all of the salamanders now face the imminent threat of extinction in the wild, due to demand for the amphibians as luxury food.
Source: Science Daily

Giant Chinese salamander is at least five distinct species, all heading toward extinction

With individuals weighing in at more than 140 pounds, the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is well known as the world’s largest amphibian. But researchers now find that those giant salamanders aren’t one species, but five, and possibly as many as eight. The bad news is that all of the salamanders now face the imminent threat of extinction in the wild, due to demand for the amphibians as luxury food.
Source: Science Daily

Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change

New research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world’s plant and animal species from climate change. Species across the globe would benefit — particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia. Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros. Reducing the risk to insects is important because they are vital for ‘ecosystem services’ such as pollinating crops and being part of the food chain.
Source: Science Daily

Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???

A team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec’s national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They calculated potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected areas in southern Quebec. Their results suggest that fifty — eighty years from now (between 2071-2100) close to half of the protected regions of southern Quebec may see a species turnover of greater than 80 %.
Source: Science Daily

Earth BioGenome Project aims to sequence genomes of 1.5 million species

Scientists is proposing a massive project to sequence, catalog and analyze the genomes of all eukaryotic species on the planet, an undertaking the researchers say will take 10 years, cost $4.7 billion and require more than 200 petabytes of digital storage capacity. Eukaryotes include all organisms except bacteria and archaea. There are an estimated 10-15 million eukaryotic species on Earth.
Source: Science Daily

Five new blanket-hermit crab species described 130 years later from the Pacific

Unlike most hermit crabs, the blanket-hermit crab does not use empty shells for protection, and instead lives symbiotically with a sea anemone. The crab uses the anemone to cover its soft abdomen, and can pull the anemone’s tissue over its head to protect itself whenever necessary. Since 1888, this crab had been considered a unique species until a research team recently described five new ones and a new genus.
Source: Science Daily

Newfound chameleon species flashes rainbow colours and a nose like Pinocchio’s

Newfound chameleon species flashes rainbow colours and a nose like Pinocchio’s

Newfound chameleon species flashes rainbow colours and a nose like Pinocchio’s, Published online: 19 April 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-04883-x

Resplendent reptile and two similar species have been discovered in the remote forests of Madagascar.
Source: Nature